Against Unrestricted Religious Liberty

The following was written in response to Tony Perkins’ article, “Why Christians Must Support Religious Liberty for Everyone” available to read here: https://www.frc.org/get.cfm?i=WA19F42&f=WU19F10

I really appreciate your ministry, Tony. We need more strong men like you to contest God’s earth against Satan’s power grab. But I must disagree with you on the premise of unrestricted religious liberty.

My first argument is that it is against reason. Alien religions are bound to influence the laws and institutions of our society; and in many cases, they use their freedom to propagate their errors and subvert our society. Don’t you see this happening before your very eyes? There is a reason why we are losing the cultural war. We have allowed the heathen to infiltrate our institutions, mis-educate our children, form public opinion, and re-interpret and remake our laws for so long, with virtually no resistance; that they have more power than we do, humanly speaking. That is the plain fact; and we should have seen it coming.

My second reason is the universal consent of all branches of the church from the beginning until the seventeenth century. As late as 1646, in the famous Westminster Confession of Faith, the idea of religious liberty for non-Christians was vigorously opposed. Until then, it was always understood by Christians that, while we have a mission of grace to unbelievers; since they are unbelievers and tools of Satan, they are the enemies of Christianity and Christian society. America was founded on the Bible and only Bible believers can maintain its system and make it work. Only with the advent of the Enlightenment, falsely so-called, did the idea appear of extending this liberty to non-Christians. The Atheists and secularists naturally wanted to be free to propagate their anti-Christian dogmas. They succeeded in changing the minds of American Christians over time. But the point is; this idea was not the result of pious believers diligently and prayerfully studying the Word. It came from outside. I view it as a an antinomian departure from the teaching of Scripture and a step in the apostasy of the churches which issued in unitarianism and theological liberalism.

My third reason is biblical. Most Christians would admit that the Ten Commandments are not obsolete; neither are they just good advice. the fifth through the tenth are in our country punishable by law. These are the lesser commandments, however. The first four condemn direct infractions against God Himself. How can it be maintained that the lesser are to be punished; but not the greater? The Israelites were not cast out of their land in the days of Nebuchadnezzar for their crimes against humanity so much as their crime of idolatry; which God took as the highest possible personal insult. (2 Chron 24:18) Righteousness is the province of Kings; and the only standard of righteousness is the law of God. Anything else is unrighteousness.

How do you defend your idea from the Bible? You know that the Old Testament is not on your side. But Jesus said that He did not come to invalidate the law or the prophets. That would seem to be sufficient authority to continue the Mosaic laws against false prophets, blasphemers and idolaters. What about the New Testament? Is your view explicitly stated anywhere in the Apostolic canon? You know that it’s not. Then it must be an inevitable consequence of some other teaching. This you cannot maintain. The attempts to do so are shallow, if not ludicrous. Jesus did not address it (but we already know what He thought) and neither did his Apostles.

However, Paul said that the authorities hold their power from God; and that they are ministers of God for the punishment of evildoers (without distinction). Now what standard is there that ultimately determines good and evil? God’s law. Therefore, it is the duty of rulers to know God’s law; and to uphold it by punishing every kind of evildoer. That they may not be aware of or respectful to this standard does not invalidate their authority; but they will be responsible to God for their use of power, based on God’s standard — not man’s.

I contend, therefore, that the dogma of unrestricted religious liberty is a grave error. Reason is against it; traditional Christianity is against it, and most importantly, the Bible is against it. Please consider these things.

I am not so naive as to think that anything can stop the humanistic philosophies and ideologies from running their destructive course (unless God intervenes) But I feel bound to contest this point whenever I am given the opportunity, even if I am a voice crying in the wilderness. I commend to you the works of the old Presbyterians, the Puritans, the Reformers, and the church fathers on this subject; works that are, in my opinion, more erudite, more soundly scriptural and more logically rigorous than anything being written today. The so-called “Theonomists” of our times have also written some good books on the subject of the relevance and authority of the law of God for our criminal law.

God be with you, brother; and keep up the good work!

Howard Douglas King

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